Jen Johnson

Jen is the Brand Manager at Printsocial. She's responsible for our brand development and strategy as well as executing marketing campaigns. She's an avid fan of the Carolina Panthers, craft beer, yoga, and good design.

3 New Painted Edge Business Card Colors

Flat Red, Pearlescent Yellow and Pearlescent Orange Painted Edge Business Cards are now Available!

Standard Red, Pearlescent Yellow, and Pearlescent Orange Painted Edge Business Cards are now available! Standard Red Step your card game up with bold standard red painted edges. The red edges present a sense of confidence and strength that will elevate any design. Pearlescent Yellow Nothing says good vibes quite like the color yellow. Make someone […]

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Standard Red, Pearlescent Yellow, and Pearlescent Orange Painted Edge Business Cards are now available!

Standard Red

Step your card game up with bold standard red painted edges. The red edges present a sense of confidence and strength that will elevate any design.

New! Flat Red Painted Edges

Pearlescent Yellow

Nothing says good vibes quite like the color yellow. Make someone smile by handing them a business card with pearlescent yellow edges. The yellow paint has a slight pearlescent shimmer that allows the color to really pop.

Pearlescent Yellow Painted Edges

Pearlescent Orange

While we love all of our painted edge color options, we are slightly bias to pearlescent orange being our fav. The color adds a creative edge to your brand and truly stands out.

Pearlescent Orange Painted Edges

Currently, our painted edge cards are 2”x 3.5” with standard corners and come in quantities of 250 and 500.

Interested in learning more about our 32PT Uncoated Painted Edge business cards? Click here.
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What is Bleed & Why do Print Files Require it?

To bleed or not to bleed – that is the question. When it comes to print, the answer is to bleed. So what exactly is bleed, and why is it required to be included in your print files? Bleed is the extra area included in a print file that allows ink and finishes to be printed […]

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To bleed or not to bleed – that is the question. When it comes to print, the answer is to bleed. So what exactly is bleed, and why is it required to be included in your print files?

Bleed is the extra area included in a print file that allows ink and finishes to be printed all the way to the edge of the printed piece. Bleeds extend further than the cut line to ensure that a white edge does not remain after the cutting process. If the incorrect amount of bleed or no bleed is included in the print file then any shift when cutting would lead to a small amount of white area remaining on the product.

All of our file setup templates include a bleed area so that you can be sure your artwork contains the correct amount of bleed. The background of your design should extend past the trim line to the edge of the file. We require all files to be submitted with bleed. The area between the red and gray lines in our templates is the bleed area. This is the area that your artwork is required to extend to.Business Card File Template The majority of our standard print products like business cards require a bleed of 0.0625″ on all sides. Your bleed can be larger than this just keep in mind that you may get a warning when you upload your files.  As long as the previews look good, you should be all set.

Check File Bleed with Uploader Feature

Large format products such as banners and H-stake signs do not require any bleed. If you any questions regarding bleed or the setup of your print files please contact one of our awesome customer service representatives. They will be happy to review your files.

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What is Print Resolution & Why Does it Matter?

300dpi compared to 72dpi

300dpi: What is it, and why does it matter?

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300dpi: What is it, and why does it matter?

Have you ever zoomed into your monitor so close that images no longer look crisp, but rather a close-up of a Monet painting? When you really zoomed in, the images lose their visibility and turn into little dots of color. Those dots are called pixels. The more dots (or pixels) you have, the better the image will look when printed. This is also what we refer to when we say “dpi” or “dots per inch”.

300dpi

A high-resolution file will have a higher number of dots, which is required for printing. 300dpi (dots per inch) is the resolution we recommend for print files. Files submitted to print that have a resolution lower than 300dpi will likely result in a lesser quality or blurred print product.  We often receive files that are 72dpi which is the required resolution for digital outputs such as computer screens. These low-resolution files will appear clear on screen but will print quite blurry. See the example below of two business card files. The left image printed at 300dpi and the right image printed at 72dpi.

Print resolution comparison

If you receive a resolution warning when uploading your files please send your files to info@printsocial.com. One of our file processors will be able to check the files and let you know if higher resolution images need to be provided.

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CMYK Rich Black Value

CMYK Rich Black Value

Printing a true or rich black can be tricky, so we’re breaking down our suggested rich black CMYK configuration and explaining why some of the frequently used black builds are not recommended. The printing industry suggests many variations of CMYK configurations for printing a true or rich black. After a lot of testing and calibration, […]

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Printing a true or rich black can be tricky, so we’re breaking down our suggested rich black CMYK configuration and explaining why some of the frequently used black builds are not recommended.

The printing industry suggests many variations of CMYK configurations for printing a true or rich black. After a lot of testing and calibration, we’ve selected a configuration that works best for our presses.

Using rich black results in a darker tone than 100% black ink alone. For the best possible results, we recommend a rich black value of C60, M40, Y40, K100 for all of our printed products.

C0, M0, Y0, K100 will usually result in a very dark gray, but not a rich black. We commonly see the default black in Adobe Photoshop used instead of our recommended rich black build. The issue with using C75, M68, Y67, K90 is that it will not print a truly rich black. That configuration is the result of converting true black in RGB to CMYK. The print result will generally be muddy due to the oversaturated color build.

For the best results, we recommend using the values listed in the above chart. Have any questions? Feel free to contact our awesome customer support team for further assistance.

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CMYK vs RGB… In the Print World, CMYK Wins Every Time

CMYK color mode wins in the print industry every time.

CMYK and RGB are acronyms that refer to color models used to create images and files. CMYK color mode is used for printing. RGB (not to be confused with Cleveland Browns quarterback RG3) color mode is used to display images that are intended to be viewed on monitors and screens only. CMYK stands for Cyan, […]

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CMYK and RGB are acronyms that refer to color models used to create images and files. CMYK color mode is used for printing. RGB (not to be confused with Cleveland Browns quarterback RG3) color mode is used to display images that are intended to be viewed on monitors and screens only.

CMYK color model used for 4 color process printing.CMYK stands for Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black. These four basic ink colors are combined together in varying amounts to create a wide variety of colors for printing. You should always request a CMYK copy of your logo or any other file that you would like to have printed from your Graphic Designer. The above Blissful Bicycle logo and marketing materials look as though they were just printed with blue ink; in actuality, the blue color is made up of 55% Cyan ink and 22% Magenta ink. When the two color values are combined for printing, the above blue is the result. RGB stands for Red, Green, and Blue. These colors are actually lights that are mixed to create and display digital images on screens and electronic devices. RGB stands for Red, Green, and Blue. These colors are actually lights that are mixed to create and display digital images on screens and electronic devices. Images created using RGB color mode are able to display very vibrantly, but those bright neon colors are not able to be reproduced using CMYK inks.

When you try to print files that are intended to be viewed digitally on a screen, the print color outcome will be much different than what appears on your screen. Here is an example of what an RGB file looks like on screen in comparison to how it looks when converted to CMYK for printing.

What RGB color values look like when converted to CMYK for printing.

If your file is going to be printed, it needs to be set up in CMYK color mode. How can you make sure your file is set up in CMYK? Below are the steps to check your print files using popular Adobe design software. 

Adobe Photoshop – Image > Mode > CMYK Color
Adobe Illustrator – File > Document Color Mode > CMYK Color
Adobe InDesign – File > Document Setup > Intent: Print

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Share the Love with Custom Valentines

Custom Printed Valentine's

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. The standard candy, gifts, flowers and cards are sure to be exchanged. This year, instead of the buying the same ole boring drug store Valentine’s Day cards, get creative by sending out customized Valentines. Incorporating a special photo on the front and a sweet message on the back […]

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Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. The standard candy, gifts, flowers and cards are sure to be exchanged.

This year, instead of the buying the same ole boring drug store Valentine’s Day cards, get creative by sending out customized Valentines. Incorporating a special photo on the front and a sweet message on the back is a sure way to warm everyone’s heart.

Think about how you felt the last time someone sent you a card that they actually made. You held on to it because it was so thoughtful and special. Give your friends and family that same feeling this year with customized Valentines. From our 2.5 x 2.5 square social cards to our 4 x 6 postcards, the possibilities are endless.

Sharing your happily ever after or the fact that your kids really do love each other just might make someone’s day.

SEE ALSO: How to Use Pinterest for Printspiration

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